Why aligning anti-corruption and human rights approaches makes good business sense

  • Bribery and corruption and human rights risks are often managed by different business functions within an organisation.
  • Organisations can strengthen their broader compliance culture by aligning processes for reducing and mitigating integrity and human rights risks.
  • Promulgating tone from the top and developing appropriate policies and procedures will only be effective if anti-bribery and corruption and human rights risks are identified accurately and the potential impacts are understood.

Environmental, social and governance (ESG) risks, in particular bribery and corruption and human rights risks, are often managed by different business functions within an organisation. But the advantages of harmonising approaches to ESG risks with common touchpoints are significant. 

By aligning processes for reducing and mitigating the impact of integrity and human rights risks, organisations can strengthen their broader compliance culture and, ultimately, build stakeholder confidence in their approach to ESG matters. 

The recent increased focus on improved accountability for ESG risks is encouraging organisations to consider the potential impact of their activities on stakeholders and other third parties, and to embed appropriate ESG risk management and compliance into decision-making and operations. 

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